HPV Vaccination is
Cancer Prevention
.

More than 25,000 HPV-related cancers occur in the U.S. each year.
There’s a vaccine that can prevent them. Get vaccinated.

Healthcare Providers

Despite overwhelming evidence of the safety and effectiveness of the HPV vaccine, immunization rates in the United States are still very low. In 2013, the National Immunization Survey revealed only 37.6 % of girls aged 13-17 received all three doses of the vaccine. A meager 13.9% of boys of the same age received the recommended three doses.  Click here to learn more about teen vaccination coverage.

RESEARCH SHOWS THAT PROVIDER RECOMMENDATION IS THE STRONGEST PREDICTOR OF VACCINATION.

In 2012, if HPV vaccine had been administered during health-care visits when another vaccine was administered, vaccination coverage for ≥1 dose for females age 13-17 could have reached 92.6%. When it comes to immunizations and preventative care, parents look to their child’s healthcare provider for guidance more than any other source. Click here to learn more about the American Academy of Pediatrics study.

WHAT CAN YOU DO?

  • Implement a standing order for HPV vaccinations for pre-teens and teens.
  • Strongly recommend the vaccine to parents of your patients who are 11 and older when they come for sick visits, well visits, and sports physicals.
  • Implement patient education and reminder systems to inform patients and parents of the benefits of HPV vaccination.
  • Have easy to read HPV vaccine education materials in waiting rooms and exam rooms so patients and their parents can be informed before you recommend the vaccine.

Here are some additional resources to help you with the conversation:

Tips and Time-savers for Talking with Parents about HPV Vaccine

Video: Recommending HPV Vaccine Successfully (RADM Anne Schuchat MD, US Public Health Service)

Get the facts.

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.

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